Black Mirror


Just finished watching last part of mini-series of “Black Mirror”, called “In Memoriam”, where memories are stored in a device called the grain, where you can view, store and save memories from past experience. So, basically you have memories of every single detail and every single aspect of your life. When you go to the airport and you pass the security, they have the right to watch your memories and see if there is anything wrong that you have done. It means that government  and probably anyone who would really want has an access to your memory. one girl got her grain stolen by the order of some chinese multi-millionaire. Overall, the plot of the story is about becoming obsessive with your memories, digging into the details and ruining your own life. As we know human nature is always inclined to see and get attached much more to negative aspects than to the positive ones. The movie itself raises the moral dilemma, by asking how much of our life should be recorded and accessible.

 

It raises a lot of ethical questions, not only direct ones. Such as:

– Where are the limits of the private life?

-If at the custom a person has the right to check memories of your past days, how can you know that he would not use it for his own advantages? Is my memory protected from manipulation and simply being erased?

-Can ideas be stolen in the form of memories?

-If you can force someone to delete the certain memories, then can you upload the fake ones?

-If someone steals your grain and you loose all your memories, does it mean that you loose your identity?

– It then raises question of identity: What we define as identity of the person and self-identification? If I think about who I am, I base my image on the ideas, experiences and images that I remember, then probably  I construct image of myself through the memory. So, if my memory is lost, does it mean that I am not any more myself?

 

Definitely worth watching….

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